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#26 2014-08-10 05:34:17

mmm....shiney!
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From: 昆士蘭
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Re: Free market regulation

Big A.D. wrote:
mmm....shiney! wrote:
Big A.D. wrote:

Indeed. It would be so much quicker and cheaper to forget all the paperwork and just get on with things.

Or not charge for the screening process.  roll

Surely a user-pays system is the fairest way of recovering the costs of screening?

Are you saying someone other than the individual receiving the accreditation should pay for it? Sounds very socialist to me.


Mate, it's both an example of the financial hurdles that government put in place when they regulate and an example of how the government raises revenue under the guise of making the world a safer place for everyone. neutral

A user-pays system for voluntary accreditation would be in the best interest of the free market. This allows comsumers to choose the level of accreditation that they wish the carer to have, with a resulting cost savings which is passed on if this is one of the criteria that a customer would be using to assess the different services on offer.

Last edited by mmm....shiney! (2014-08-10 07:55:44)


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#27 2014-08-10 07:49:33

Pirocco
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Re: Free market regulation

Basically all that regulation and associated fees are nothing but taxes with excuses.
Rather predictable because... what is State?
An institution that strives for being paid regardless what they do, inclusing and especially nothing and harm, without suffering punishments / consequences.
Much like the mafia and any organized criminals.
They inflict you havoc/loss, enough as to give you not much choice.
Then they come to offer you protection against it, at a price.
Put end to end and you can clearly recognize a license to steal, written by, and granted to, a thief. big_smile


Silver won't save you if you act as clueless and careless as with your bank account.
Get in- not disinformed. Last is easiest, visit www.zerohedge.com & Co and hurry to their bullion shops.
Futures: http://forums.silverstackers.com/topic- … ilver.html #9
Central Banks inflict you less gold and fiat: http://forums.silverstackers.com/topic- … tners.html #19

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#28 2014-08-11 01:17:20

hawkeye
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Re: Free market regulation

mmm....shiney! wrote:

Mmmm, pass legislation requiring screening of workers in certain industries, then introduce a fee that has to be paid, then keep upping the fee. Gotta love governments. hmm

Public sector workers have bills to pay, mortgages to pay.  Inflation keeps going up you know.  They have to have commensurate cost of living increases in their salaries.  That money has to come from somewhere.

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#29 2014-08-11 03:39:41

Pirocco
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Re: Free market regulation

In my country, the average monthly pension/retirement fee of a public worker is over twice the one of a private worker. Yes, the average. The money for both comes from the latter.


Silver won't save you if you act as clueless and careless as with your bank account.
Get in- not disinformed. Last is easiest, visit www.zerohedge.com & Co and hurry to their bullion shops.
Futures: http://forums.silverstackers.com/topic- … ilver.html #9
Central Banks inflict you less gold and fiat: http://forums.silverstackers.com/topic- … tners.html #19

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#30 2014-08-14 08:07:12

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Free market regulation

And just in case you thought that on the whole parents were best placed to raise their own children:

Childcare workers say children won't meet their potential if their carers aren't properly qualified.

Childcare experts react angrily to Productivity Commission proposals

Children will struggle to meet their learning potential if a proposal to water down educational standards in early childhood is adopted, experts warn.

As part of its inquiry into creating a more sustainable childcare system, the Productivity Commission recommended lowering qualifications for staff who work with children under three.

But leaders in the sector rejected the proposal, citing evidence that quality early childhood education provided a strong foundation for lifelong learning.

All the "expert" women quoted had a financial stake in a government funded industry - whether it was a university position, child care centre owner or childcare umbrella organisation. And just in case any of you with infants had any preconceived notions that you had the capacity to act in the best interest of your child even if you have no formal qualification:

''NSW babies, like all children in Australia, will miss out really badly if you take away the need for their educators to be qualified.''

And finally:

Lyn Connolly, the owner of eight childcare centres in Sydney's west, said children deserved education and care, regardless of whether their parents were employed or not.

Ummm, why do your kids need day care if you don't go to work?

Last edited by mmm....shiney! (2014-08-14 08:11:29)


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#31 2014-09-24 18:42:20

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Free market regulation

Went on a pub crawl on Tuesday, arrived at the last drinking hole at about 3pm, decided to have a shot of spiced rum no ice. The young bartender asked if I wanted a nip or a shot, confused I asked for a nip in a shot glass, she told me I can't have a shot of rum because shots can only be sold after 8pm, but I can have a normal glass with a nip in it. I said to her that makes sense, I'm 51, how would I be capable of knowing what's in my best self-interest? Thank the government for the Nanny State.

She looked at me, smiled and gave me the drink.


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#32 2014-09-24 19:24:32

renovator
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From: QLD
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Re: Free market regulation

mmm....shiney! wrote:

Went on a pub crawl on Tuesday, arrived at the last drinking hole at about 3pm, decided to have a shot of spiced rum no ice. The young bartender asked if I wanted a nip or a shot, confused I asked for a nip in a shot glass, she told me I can't have a shot of rum because shots can only be sold after 8pm, but I can have a normal glass with a nip in it. I said to her that makes sense, I'm 51, how would I be capable of knowing what's in my best self-interest? Thank the government for the Nanny State.

She looked at me, smiled and gave me the drink.

Is that right ?  They have no idea creating a law that has a huge hole in it .... priceless stupidity. You should be thankful ,your old enough to remember the pubs not opening on sundays & then sessions on sundays in QLD. Those were the days .... We just used to go to the army base to buy takeaway beer on sundays it was open everyday .( think about it the general population couldnt buy beer on sundays but the people protecting our country could be pissed as parrots )  so the stupid laws have been around since the 70s


i used to be disgusted now im just amused

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#33 2014-09-24 19:48:41

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Free market regulation

Pet medication:

753_screen_shot_2014-09-25_at_94545_am.png

753_screen_shot_2014-09-25_at_94938_am.png

753_screen_shot_2014-09-25_at_94654_am.png

All adding to the cost or limiting the information available to consumers to help them make their own informed decisions.

http://www.petceutics.com.au/faq/#answer1


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#34 2014-09-24 22:11:07

bordsilver
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Re: Free market regulation

mmm....shiney! wrote:

Went on a pub crawl on Tuesday, arrived at the last drinking hole at about 3pm, decided to have a shot of spiced rum no ice. The young bartender asked if I wanted a nip or a shot, confused I asked for a nip in a shot glass, she told me I can't have a shot of rum because shots can only be sold after 8pm, but I can have a normal glass with a nip in it. I said to her that makes sense, I'm 51, how would I be capable of knowing what's in my best self-interest? Thank the government for the Nanny State.

She looked at me, smiled and gave me the drink.

In the ACT it was restricted to certain "high risk" bars. When I wanted a nip of scotch without ice, I was informed that that was still classed as a shot and they weren't allowed to serve it after <whatever-it-was>PM.

I asked whether this stupid rule also referred to having to serve Cognac with ice (the horror yikes ) To which, they said it was apparently ALL spirits. After some discussion he put a spoon in my whiskey glass, dropped an ice cube in which I then lifted straight out with the spoon.

Getting double shots to avoid having to line up at the bar for 5-10 minutes were also banned but he could sell me two glasses roll


The only good tax is a repealed tax.

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#35 2014-09-24 23:21:25

smk762
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Re: Free market regulation

Anyone considered the possibility of increased profits due to these policies?

http://theconversation.com/recruiting-g … easy-19413


Note: No view / opinion I express is to be construed in any way as representative of entities which I may be associated with, including but not limited to employers, clubs, or charitable organisations. All commentary is made as a private citizen, regardless of the method of creative expression, and in accordance with personal integrity and my perception of the public interest. This disclaimer is to be applied perpetually and retroactively.Hi ASIO roll

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#36 2014-09-25 00:12:46

Clawhammer
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Re: Free market regulation

What I don't understand is why when regulators (i.e. the Govt.)  increase taxes on things such as alcopops & cigarettes its because they want to decrease the public's participation in them...

but when they increase taxes on income & productivity they think it will do the opposite....

Last edited by Clawhammer (2014-09-25 00:24:42)


Specialisation is for insects

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#37 2014-09-25 00:31:08

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Free market regulation

^^ lol

Just fkn awesome.


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#38 2014-10-04 19:20:52

bordsilver
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Re: Free market regulation

Recent AFR op-ed by David Leyonhjelm on our beloved ACCC regulator.

David Leyonhjelm wrote:

'The Sims 4' is the latest instalment of a computer game best described as a virtual but living dollhouse. There's no specific goal; players just create characters and then care for or irritate them as they please. It has been promoted as the 'game that lets you play with life like never before'.

It's hard to fathom, but 'The Sims' is one of the most popular computer games ever. It's also highly addictive, with players glued to their computers day and night.
I suspect that Rod Sims is a Sims addict.

Mr Sims is the chairman of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. It seems he loves to delve into the mundane, day-to-day interactions of everyday Australians. I'm sure he cares for his characters, but they nonetheless register a fair deal of irritation in response to his manipulations. And often his manipulations do not seem to serve a specific goal.

For instance, Mr Sims and the ACCC love to check labels. They decided that Maggie Beer's slogan 'A Barossa Food Tradition' could appear on most of her food range, but not the ice-cream, biscuits, vinegar and olive oil. While they tasted exquisite, they were made in Queensland and Victoria.

Mr Sims and the ACCC also check websites. They don't like it when a website like Urbanspoon hosts comments from reviewers like 'this restaurant has nice ambience', when in fact the restaurant is far too noisy. That's why they said, 'It's time for the industry to bring its behaviour into line with ACCC expectations.'

Mr Sims and the ACCC set rules for the design of everyday items, so everyday Australians needn't worry about how to use things safely. For instance, they now regulate what type of material a hot water bottle must be, what thickness it must be, and how its cap needs to be shaped — even producing a video showing best practice hot water bottle use. This is in response to estimates of around 200 hospitalisations each year from hot water bottle related burns, out of a population of 23½ million.

Mr Sims and the ACCC like clear boundaries between the markets they scrutinise. So when Coles and Woollies offer fuel discounts that a business solely operating in the fuel market can't match, they don't like it. Four cents a litre off is okay, 8 cents is not.

Mr Sims and the ACCC want people to play fair, so they police rules preventing 'unconscionable' conduct. This may be a vague lawyer's term for something between 'unfair' and 'immoral', but rest assured, the ACCC knows it when it sees it. Mr Sims and the ACCC also issue various mandatory industry codes. In these they share, and impose, their wisdom in areas of ACCC expertise ranging from horticulture to groceries.

Mr Sims and the ACCC spend around $175 million a year manipulating markets as if they were playing a computer game. This cost does not count the red tape and legal costs imposed on businesses. The ACCC takes a lot of businesses to court, tending to lose the big cases but gaining comfort from putting businesses through the legal wringer. It would probably fail a cost benefit analysis, even if its market manipulations sometimes save consumers money.

The ACCC believes in a quaint microeconomic theory of yesteryear. Like Keynesian macroeconomics, it was crafted in a time of hope and innocence, when analysis was 'partial' and 'static' — to use the language of economists — and the bureaucracy was assumed to be omniscient, omnipotent, and benevolent. Unfortunately for the ACCC, 'general' and 'dynamic' analysis that accounts for imperfections in bureaucracy leads to far less interventionist conclusions.

The manipulations of Mr Sims would be vital if the world were as simple as the ACCC's microeconomic theory suggests. But alas, such a simple world is but a simulation.

In certain respects, the ACCC is a victim of progress. As markets have opened and liberalised over past decades, and as technology has quickened the sharing of information about good and bad businesses, the need for a market nanny has diminished. So we are left with a staffed up bureaucracy that seeks to legitimise the complaints of busybodies rather than promote competition with grown-up advice: 'buyer beware'. This leaves the ACCC tilting at windmills.

Mr Sims is passionate and energetic. He is also highly esteemed. He played a key role in the Prime Minister's Department driving the wide-sweeping deregulatory reforms of the Hawke-Keating era. It is just a shame that quixotic verve was more useful then, rather than now he is ACCC chair.

Last edited by bordsilver (2014-10-04 19:21:15)


The only good tax is a repealed tax.

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#39 2014-10-05 07:09:14

hawkeye
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Re: Free market regulation

^^ Do you have link for that Bord? 

I'm starting to like this guy.  I wonder if he has always thought this way (libertarian) or whether it is a recent development for him.

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#40 2014-10-05 19:13:17

bordsilver
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Re: Free market regulation

hawkeye wrote:

^^ Do you have link for that Bord? 

I'm starting to like this guy.  I wonder if he has always thought this way (libertarian) or whether it is a recent development for him.

It's on his facebook page along with most of his speeches and articles - https://www.facebook.com/DavidLeyonhjel … 0901125814

and has been reposted on Catallaxy Files http://catallaxyfiles.com/2014/10/04/gu … cc-powers/


The only good tax is a repealed tax.

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#41 2014-10-05 20:35:05

hawkeye
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Re: Free market regulation

Cool.  He needs to read some Rothbard if he hasn't already.

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#42 2014-10-17 17:52:44

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Free market regulation

Tragic and devastating news:

Grate collapse kills 16 at pop concert south of Seoul in Seongnam City

SIXTEEN people watching an outdoor pop concert in South Korea have fallen 20 meters to their deaths, after a ventilation grate they were standing on collapsed.

Photos of the scene in Seongnam, just south of Seoul, showed a deep concrete shaft under the broken grate.

snip

The collapse came as South Korea is still struggling with the aftermath of a ferry disaster in April that left more than 300 people dead or missing.

For a time, the sinking jolted South Korea into thinking about safety issues that had been almost universally overlooked as the country rose from poverty and war to an Asian power.

The tragedy exposed regulatory failures that appear to have allowed the ferry Sewol to set off with far more cargo than it could safely carry. Family members say miscommunications and delays during rescue efforts doomed their loved ones.

Analysts say many safety problems in the country stem from little regulation, light punishment for violators and wide ignorance about safety in general — and a tendency to value economic advancement over all else.

http://www.news.com.au/world/asia/grate … 7094382061

What will happen will be typical of how government regulation has been introduced over much of the past 2 centuries. The government will move to introduce tougher regulatory standards and then take credit for their introduction. What is obvious though is that it is only on the agenda due to a shift in the dominant paradigm. In other words, just like the abolition of of child labour in factories in England, or the introduction of health regulations in meat processing facilities in the US in the late 1800's, there is a growing movement in place in South Korea for greater emphasis on safety.

With a mounting list of errors that appeared to have contributed to the disaster, maritime experts, the news media and regular citizens venting their anger on social media have begun to question what they describe as inadequate safety precautions and often lax regulation of businesses.

snip

The country's top newspapers reflected the growing sense of anger, and shock, over what they suggested was a lack of proper oversight. "Are we a safe society or a third-rate people?" read one editorial headline in the newspaper Joong-Ang.

snip

In South Korea, more than 31,000 people, including 3,000 students, die every year in accidents, accounting for 12.8 percent of the country's total annual deaths, the highest rate among major developed nations.

Those episodes include everything from car accidents to fires, and it is unclear how much can be attributed to a lack of focus on safety. But there is a general acknowledgment in hypercompetitive South Korea that success is often measured by how quickly and cheaply a job is done, and that spending too much time and resources trying to follow rules is sometimes seen as losing a competitive edge.

The regulations are there but they are not enforced, because it's not a significant aspect of Sth Korean culture:

Kim Chang-je, a professor of navigation science at Korea Maritime and Ocean University, said the complaints appeared to be true of the ferry business. "We have the safety regulations and systems that were similar to global norms," he said. "But they are not properly enforced."

snip

Experts say they suspect some of the problems with the ship resulted from lax enforcement of safety standards made possible by ties among the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, the Korea Shipping Association and shipping companies.

The shipping association is a lobby for shipping companies and is financed by them. But it is also charged with inspecting ships for safety measures, such as a proper and balanced stowage of cargo. In addition, many senior officials from the ministry — which is supposed to oversee the association's enforcement — also join the association after they retire.

"We will never be able to expect safety regulations to be properly enforced until the shipping association becomes independent," said Jung Yun-chul, another maritime safety expert at Korea Maritime and Ocean University.

In an editorial on Monday, The Chosun Ilbo, the nation's largest newspaper, summed up the sense that with more care for safety, the calamity might have been avoided.

"In Korea, people who insist on abiding by basic rules are often considered annoying or inflexible, while those who are adept at dodging them are seen as smart," it said. "But the country is full of such smart people, and the result has been catastrophic."

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/23/world … .html?_r=0

Thankfully, the discussion about safety is taking place, and corporations and business organisations are taking action:

At the meeting of presidents, the Hyundai Heavy group decided on emergency investments totaling 300 billion won ($296 million) to enhance safety. As a first step, the group's safety management organs have been unified and placed under the direct supervision of a president. In addition, the number of safety workers at contractors will be doubled, and related training will be upgraded.

Other South Korean companies are taking action, too. Leading steelmaker Posco decided this month to provide more than two hours of monthly safety education for all employees. It also resolved to work out new measures by establishing a global safety center at its headquarters in the city of Pohang. The Samsung group, which has embarked on a two-year safety investment plan worth 3 trillion won, conducted a disaster drill in Seoul on May 14.

http://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Economy … ink-safety

It won't be government regulation that saves South Koreans from themselves - it will be themselves.

Last edited by mmm....shiney! (2014-10-17 17:53:58)


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#43 2014-11-19 04:45:14

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Free market regulation

Free market consumer protection:

https://support.google.com/trustedstore … ogram&rd=1

Last edited by mmm....shiney! (2015-01-15 19:44:25)


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#44 2014-11-19 05:34:25

bordsilver
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Re: Free market regulation


The only good tax is a repealed tax.

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#45 2015-01-15 19:54:27

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Free market regulation

Political hot potato: WA government rejects calls for Soviet-style regulator to be abolished

A WA farmer is giving away 200 tonnes of 'illegal' spuds as a public protest against a bizarre, Soviet-style Ministry of Potatoes, which imposes strict controls on the production and distribution of the vegetable.

Like in Soviet Russia, the WA Government wants to control supply to keep prices steady.

In WA, the powerful Potato Marketing Corporation controls who can grow potatoes, how many hectares can be planted and the varieties produced.

The PMC, established under the Marketing of Potatoes Act 1946, also has the power to search vehicles suspected of carrying more than 50kg of potatoes, demand the details of the driver and impound any 'illegal' potatoes.

Tony Galati, who has been battling the regulator for the last 20 years, is facing the threat of prosecution for growing about 10 per cent more than his allotted potato quota, The Australian revealed this week.

Simon Breheney from the Legal Rights Project at free-market think-tank the Institute of Public Affairs:

Mr Breheny said history showed removing price controls resulted in lower costs for consumers. "Competition means some producers will survive and others won't, but that is the reality of a free market. At the end of the day the outcomes for consumers are always better with greater competition."

The WA Potato Growers Association is in favour of keeping the PMC, with chief executive Jim Turley calling for Mr Galati to be prosecuted for overplanting.

They should have cast Jim Turley in the role of Wesley Mouch for "Atlas Shrugged"  yikes  lol

More here:

http://www.news.com.au/finance/business … 7185925919


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#46 2015-01-16 03:30:22

Berniemac
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From: Melbourne
Registered: 2014-09-12
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Re: Free market regulation

Sooo...two pages of posts and not one person defending free market regulation?

No fun having a discussion where everyone agrees, so allow me to play devils advocate:

Just as I cant poison someone's drink without the police arresting me, so too businesses can't polute the water supply, or dodgy builders use inferior materials, or create an unsafe working environment for an employee, without govt regulators stepping in.

An unregulated free market doesn't account for criminals or short sighted profiteers. I've worked for enough for them to know if there weren't laws and police enforcing them (worksafe etc), working conditions for the average Australian would be terrible.

Look at the average standard of living in free-market havens like Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, vs more leftie pinko countries like Australia, Denmark and Canada.

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#47 2015-01-16 03:45:17

smk762
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Re: Free market regulation

The spud situation is stupid, and an example of reg fail. I'm 90% on board with free market econs, but the 10% of pricks with a profit above all ethics mindset make me wary of anything beyond minarchy.


Note: No view / opinion I express is to be construed in any way as representative of entities which I may be associated with, including but not limited to employers, clubs, or charitable organisations. All commentary is made as a private citizen, regardless of the method of creative expression, and in accordance with personal integrity and my perception of the public interest. This disclaimer is to be applied perpetually and retroactively.Hi ASIO roll

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#48 2015-01-16 05:01:16

SpacePete
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Re: Free market regulation

Berniemac wrote:

...Just as I cant poison someone's drink without the police arresting me, so too businesses can't polute the water supply, or dodgy builders use inferior materials, or create an unsafe working environment for an employee, without govt regulators stepping in.

An unregulated free market doesn't account for criminals or short sighted profiteers. I've worked for enough for them to know if there weren't laws and police enforcing them (worksafe etc), working conditions for the average Australian would be terrible.

If the market for everything was truly unregulated, maybe there would be an opportunity for a privately funded enforcement company with private military contractors to forcefully discourage certain business activities, e.g. if you dump asbestos outside a daycare centre for young kids (as happens in Sydney already) then you can expect your business to be terminated with extreme prejudice and maybe even end up with a pair of cement shoes, Mafia style.

Last edited by SpacePete (2015-01-16 05:01:55)


Catus amat piscem, sed non vult tingere plantas

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#49 2015-01-16 05:07:20

Newtosilver
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Re: Free market regulation

SilverPete wrote:
Berniemac wrote:

...Just as I cant poison someone's drink without the police arresting me, so too businesses can't polute the water supply, or dodgy builders use inferior materials, or create an unsafe working environment for an employee, without govt regulators stepping in.

An unregulated free market doesn't account for criminals or short sighted profiteers. I've worked for enough for them to know if there weren't laws and police enforcing them (worksafe etc), working conditions for the average Australian would be terrible.

If the market for everything was truly unregulated, maybe there would be an opportunity for a privately funded enforcement company with private military contractors to forcefully discourage certain business activities, e.g. if you dump asbestos outside a daycare centre for young kids (as happens in Sydney already) then you can expect your business to be terminated with extreme prejudice and maybe even end up with a pair of cement shoes, Mafia style.


Unless you own the privately funded enforcement company then you can dump stuff wherever you want smile


"Never go into a deal believing the other side will treat you fairly. That doesn't mean you screw people just that you expect them to do that to you and then you will never be disappointed."

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#50 2015-01-16 05:24:14

SpacePete
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Registered: 2014-03-01
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Re: Free market regulation

Newtosilver wrote:
SilverPete wrote:
Berniemac wrote:

...Just as I cant poison someone's drink without the police arresting me, so too businesses can't polute the water supply, or dodgy builders use inferior materials, or create an unsafe working environment for an employee, without govt regulators stepping in.

An unregulated free market doesn't account for criminals or short sighted profiteers. I've worked for enough for them to know if there weren't laws and police enforcing them (worksafe etc), working conditions for the average Australian would be terrible.

If the market for everything was truly unregulated, maybe there would be an opportunity for a privately funded enforcement company with private military contractors to forcefully discourage certain business activities, e.g. if you dump asbestos outside a daycare centre for young kids (as happens in Sydney already) then you can expect your business to be terminated with extreme prejudice and maybe even end up with a pair of cement shoes, Mafia style.


Unless you own the privately funded enforcement company then you can dump stuff wherever you want smile

Or a private defence force to repel the enforcers.

Ultimately it may come down to who can make the most money to fund the most powerful private military. We can probably look to the black market for profitable ideas. For example, gangs who deal in drugs and weapons and who ruthlessly control their empires.


Catus amat piscem, sed non vult tingere plantas

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