Silver Stackers logo

Silver Stackers

Discussion forum for those
who love to stack precious metals

You are not logged in.

Announcement

Forum registration is open.

#26 2014-03-05 04:44:38

spannermonkey
Silver Stacker
From: Vic or pissed
Registered: 2010-06-04
Posts: 14,648
Trades :   228 

Re: asteroid mining?

Naphthalene Man wrote:
Holdfast wrote:

Thrust...yes...that's why they will use Argon and Krypton...the tech gears of thrust!

If Argon is used, it's like first gear and is used to "get-away" from Earth but once free of Earth's gravity Krypton can be used for "real" power.

That is something I would expect spannermonkey to talk about when discussing his vw's.
Holdfast- Are you sure you aren't spanner?

roll
I do take that as an insult yikes


EXIT STAGE LEFT

Offline

#27 2014-03-05 04:47:05

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

spannermonkey wrote:
Naphthalene Man wrote:
Holdfast wrote:

Thrust...yes...that's why they will use Argon and Krypton...the tech gears of thrust!

If Argon is used, it's like first gear and is used to "get-away" from Earth but once free of Earth's gravity Krypton can be used for "real" power.

That is something I would expect spannermonkey to talk about when discussing his vw's.
Holdfast- Are you sure you aren't spanner?

roll
I do take that as an insult yikes


I don't! LOL big_smile

Offline

#28 2014-03-05 08:07:41

AngloSaxon
Member
From: Sydney
Registered: 2012-10-26
Posts: 1,980
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

SilverPete wrote:

Uh, how come I can't edit my post?

You're too new a member. Don't worry about it. We all got a laugh and don't take it personally.


Age Res Proprias Tuas

Now reading: Coming Apart - The State of America by Charles Murray.

Offline

The following user says thank you for this post: Holdfast

#29 2014-03-24 20:04:04

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

NASA Unveils Plans For an Asteroid Capture Mission

NASA is currently working on one of the most difficult parts of its asteroid-retrieval mission: finding an appropriate space rock to shrink-wrap in space.

Dozens of asteroids have been identified by scientists as "promising targets" for NASA's asteroid-capture mission.
The space agency will attempt to drag a small asteroid, or a piece of a larger one, to a stable orbit around the moon, where it can be visited by astronauts by 2025, according to SPACE.com.

http://www.autoworldnews.com/articles/6 … ission.htm

asteroid.jpg?w=600
http://images.autoworldnews.com/data/im … .jpg?w=600


NASA is looking for ways to actualize its asteroid capturing scheme.
Plan is to capture a 500-ton asteroid and put it into orbit around the Moon. It will then be used as refueling space stations for astronauts making their way to Mars.

http://austriantribune.com/informatione … ure-scheme

nasa-develop-plan-asteroid-capture-scheme.jpg
http://austriantribune.com/sites/defaul … scheme.jpg

Offline

#30 2014-07-01 05:36:01

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is releasing the Earthly equivalent of two glasses of water into space every second.

The observations were made by the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO), aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft on June 6, 2014.

The detection of water vapor has implications not only for cometary science, but also for mission planning, as the Rosetta team prepares the spacecraft to become the first ever to orbit a comet (planned for August), and the first to deploy a lander to its surface (planned for November 11).

"At this production rate, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko would fill an Olympic-size swimming pool in about 100 days. But, as the comet gets closer to the sun, the gas production rate will increase.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?r … ly20140630


Mmm water in space. cool

Offline

#31 2014-07-02 12:58:48

Philski
Member
From: Tasmania
Registered: 2011-09-09
Posts: 535
Trades :   41 
Website

Re: asteroid mining?

Did you know? Nothing on this planet above the specific gravity of Iron came from this solar system. Our heavy minerals on Earth, Venus, Mars and Mercury are the end result of an exploding super nova in a distant galaxy consuming and converting hydrogen into helium into Fe into Au etc etc. As above in holdfasts post, Nasa are hoping to captured an asteroid and transport it to our moon to be put in its orbit, so we can observe and study it with ease. It may have even been yesterday or the day before they captured it. Its game on.

The rosetta comet is another.

taken from Nasa:
Comets are time capsules containing primitive material left over from the epoch when the sun and its planets formed. By studying the gas, dust and structure of the nucleus and organic materials associated with the comet, via both remote and in-situ observations, the Rosetta mission should be a key to unlocking the history and evolution of our solar system, as well as answering questions regarding the origin of Earth's water and perhaps even life. Rosetta will be the first mission in history to rendezvous with a comet, escort it as it orbits the sun, and deploy a lander to its surface.

The comets may be an eventual sources of water for deep space flight and vehicles for us to travel though space, And, at the very least offer a better understanding of our own solar system.

Offline

The following user says thank you for this post: Holdfast

#32 2014-07-26 18:44:17

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

The European Space Agency's attempt to land the first spacecraft on a distant ball of ice. (Ten years to get there) cool

Rosetta, will rendezvous with Comet 67-P (67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko) in about 12 days.

Final landing sequence, scheduled for November 11 when Rosetta will release its Lander named Philae.
http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-te … zwyro.html


Philae_descent.jpg
http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2014/03/28 … -is-awake/

Offline

The following 3 users say thank you for this post: ironwood, ego2spare, SpacePete

#33 2014-07-26 19:29:24

ego2spare
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2013-06-01
Posts: 1,700
Trades :   30 

Re: asteroid mining?

Holdfast wrote:

The European Space Agency's attempt to land the first spacecraft on a distant ball of ice. (Ten years to get there) cool

Rosetta, will rendezvous with Comet 67-P (67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko) in about 12 days.


these vids are for everyone who dosent know about the rosetta mission up until now. its a good way to explain things for people like me lol. these videos will make u care....and if u still dont, u have no soul lol

Last edited by ego2spare (2014-07-26 19:30:06)


There were more millionaires created during the Great Depression than any other time in history.

Offline

The following 3 users say thank you for this post: SpacePete, Holdfast, ironwood

#34 2014-07-27 20:09:31

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

Offline

#35 2014-07-30 03:57:45

ScottyRS
Member
From: United Kingdom
Registered: 2014-05-27
Posts: 219
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

ego2spare wrote:

3 trillion dollars to figure out how to get there and mine.... 300 billion dollars for the equipment... 200 billion dollars to bring that small amount of metal back (everytime)..... The HUUGE rise in metals prices when they realize how bullshit all that was.......priceless wink



**it will never freaking happen**

Sounds like a normal day in American banking... making up numbers and things!


"If one day the speed kills me, do not cry because I was smiling." - Paul Walker

Offline

#36 2014-08-06 07:40:52

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

Update post 32

*Today, Rosetta is just 100 km from the comet's surface.

*As many as five possible landing sites will be identified by late August, before the primary site is identified in mid-September.

*The final timeline for the sequence of events for deploying Philae - currently expected for 11 November - will be confirmed by the middle of October.

"Over the next few months, in addition to characterising the comet nucleus and setting the bar for the rest of the mission, we will begin final preparations for another space history first: landing on a comet,".

"*After landing, Rosetta will continue to accompany the comet until its closest approach to the Sun in August 2015 and beyond, watching its behaviour from close quarters to give us a unique insight and real time experience of how a comet works as it hurtles around the Sun."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/spac … Earth.html

Well...it looks as if mankind is getting closer and closer to landing on a small object that is travelling at about 34,175 miles per hour
If the mission is successful, the implications are mind boggling...asteroid capture...asteroid mining...re-directing asteroids for use in space missions or protecting Earth from collisions (Or Maybe as weapons).

H

THUMB.jpg
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/spac … Earth.html

Last edited by Holdfast (2014-08-06 07:42:28)

Offline

The following user says thank you for this post: bordsilver

#37 2014-08-06 07:43:49

Pirocco
Member
From: EUSSR
Registered: 2011-05-24
Posts: 4,831
Trades :   
Website

Re: asteroid mining?

I think the only nonfantasy asteroid mining is the one where you sit down on Mother Earth and wait for one to come within reach of your shovel.


Silver won't save you if you act as clueless and careless as with your bank account.
Get in- not disinformed. Last is easiest, visit www.zerohedge.com & Co and hurry to their bullion shops.
Futures: http://forums.silverstackers.com/topic- … ilver.html #9
Central Banks inflict you less gold and fiat: http://forums.silverstackers.com/topic- … tners.html #19

Offline

#38 2014-08-06 19:20:09

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

Pirocco wrote:

I think the only nonfantasy asteroid mining is the one where you sit down on Mother Earth and wait for one to come within reach of your shovel.


A fantasy???  Maybe but...there's plenty of fledgling missions that are very interested in asteroids.

Hayabusa was an unmanned spacecraft developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to return a sample of material from a small near-Earth asteroid named 25143 Itokawa to Earth for further analysis.

Hayabusa, was launched on 9 May 2003 and rendezvoused with Itokawa in mid-September 2005.

After arriving at Itokawa, Hayabusa studied the asteroid's shape, spin, topography, colour, composition, density, and history. In November 2005, it landed on the asteroid and collected samples in the form of tiny grains of asteroidal material, which were returned to Earth aboard the spacecraft on 13 June 2010.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hayabusa


*So it would seem, landing isn't a problem.
*Collecting samples isn't a problem.


And...with more and more space missions that allow us to find the composition of planets and asteroids there's plenty of interest in resources.
Capturing may be challenging but...you can bet your stack that sooner or later, asteroids and near celestial bodies will be mined.

Last edited by Holdfast (2014-08-06 19:21:02)

Offline

The following user says thank you for this post: AngloSaxon

#39 2014-08-25 11:36:22

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

Within the next decade or so, the space agency wants to snag the space rock and haul it to the moon. cool

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/nas … -path-mars

Offline

#40 2014-08-25 12:53:51

S. Ohno
Member
From: Japan
Registered: 2012-08-11
Posts: 427
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

^ Hayabusa and re-entry capsule 2010 coin design competetion winner

7652_hayabusa.jpg

To boldly collect dust where no man has gone before...

Offline

The following 2 users say thank you for this post: Greely, Holdfast

#41 2014-09-01 21:54:32

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

5-percent scale model of NASA's Space Launch System

Don't turn your volume-up...this is very loud.

Story.
http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles … sa-sls.htm

Last edited by Holdfast (2014-09-01 21:55:15)

Offline

#42 2014-09-09 08:46:09

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

The US is taking a major step forward in interplanetary mining, drafting a new bill to aid development of the asteroid mining industry.

A bill has been forward "to promote the development of a commercial asteroid resources industry for outer space in the United States and to increase the exploration and utilisation of asteroid resources in outer space".

"We do know now that:

* there are materials of enormous economic interest available in space.

*any near earth object has a platinum group metals concentration greater than the best terrestrial ores," according to Princeton's Space Studies Institute director Lee Valentine in his article A Space Roadmap: Mine the Sky, Defend the Earth, Settle the Universe.

*The moon is also understood to hold more than twenty times the amount of titanium and platinum than anywhere on earth, as well as the extremely rare helium 3 – which is valued at around $90 000 per ounce.

Read more at:

http://www.ferret.com.au/articles/news/ … l-n2517396

Offline

The following user says thank you for this post: systematic

#43 2014-09-15 05:53:50

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?


2010 comment - Obama Aims to Send Astronauts to an Asteroid, Then to Mars
http://www.space.com/8222-obama-aims-se … -mars.html

Offline

#44 2014-10-25 21:32:22

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

Just 17 days to go before Rosetta releases Philae to land on Comet  67P/C-G

"Water"

European Space Agency, ESA made this vid which...is pretty cool  cool

Offline

#45 2014-10-26 03:53:08

Kael
Silver Stacker
From: Perth Area, WA
Registered: 2014-08-21
Posts: 89
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

That is pretty cool

Offline

The following user says thank you for this post: Holdfast

#46 2014-11-04 01:00:05

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

And...the orbits are becoming more complex. (59 second mark) Amazing really!

Lets hope all goes well. smile

8 days to deployment on 12 Nov.

Rosetta: close orbits to lander deployment (annotated)

Offline

#47 2014-11-11 16:36:05

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

12 November 2014

History made today and tomorrow.

Philae may land on  comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. cool

Just after 7.30pm (AEST) the probe will eject its washing-machine sized lander Philae, having received its final set of signal commands from ground control 18 hours earlier via a satellite north of Perth.

Lets hope all goes well. smile

http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-te … 1kel3.html

Journey to a comet and science on the surface

Offline

#48 2014-11-12 06:18:01

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

The Philae landing craft separated from the main Rosetta spacecraft at 8.35am GMT, with confirmation received on Earth at 9.05am GMT. cool

The lander will now fall for seven hours before contact with the surface of comet 67P.

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014 … other-ship

Offline

#49 2014-11-12 07:24:31

whinfell
Silver Stacker
From: Australia
Registered: 2012-03-22
Posts: 3,325
Trades :   44 

Re: asteroid mining?

Shouldn't these posts about Rosetta/Philae be in a "Comet mining" thread?

Pedants R'Us tongue

Offline

#50 2014-11-12 14:59:20

Holdfast
Member
From: Australia
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 8,192
Trades :   

Re: asteroid mining?

Touchdown smile

ESA's Rosetta mission has soft-landed its Philae probe on a comet, the first time in history that such an extraordinary feat has been achieved.

After a tense wait during the seven-hour descent to the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, the signal confirming the successful touchdown arrived on Earth at 16:03 GMT (17:03 CET). cool

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space … s_on_comet

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB