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#51 2017-03-19 20:38:44

mmm....shiney!
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From: 昆士蘭
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

The OP was serious.  smile


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#52 2017-03-19 20:40:06

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

bordsilver wrote:
Big A.D. wrote:

So, in essence, your entire argument is based on an understanding of how traditional economics involving humans works, but you have no clue about what will happen when we start throwing robots and artificial intelligences into the mix?

Yeah, that's kind of my point.

Well I did already address that. Automation is nothing especially new or scary and is highly desirable.

True AI however, does have the potential to replace humanity altogether and humans become extinct. A robot tax will not fix the issue of a war between two intelligent species.

We'll be at war with aliens before we're at war with robots.

Just ask skyrocket.


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#53 2017-03-19 21:21:47

Killface
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

mmm....shiney! wrote:

The OP was serious.  smile

Well in that case, I refer you to post four, which advocates applying the highest tax bracket to the wages earned by said robots.

Clearly this will fix the problem as they are performing highly skilled, valuable work.

(Insert absolutely earnest, definitely not sarcastic smiley)


All that glitters is not gold...
...but all that is gold glitters!

Stacker formerly known as HoldMeTender

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#54 2017-03-19 21:44:00

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

HoldMeTender wrote:
mmm....shiney! wrote:

The OP was serious.  smile

Well in that case, I refer you to post four, which advocates applying the highest tax bracket to the wages earned by said robots.

Clearly this will fix the problem as they are performing highly skilled, valuable work.

(Insert absolutely earnest, definitely not sarcastic smiley)

Talk to Elon, he owns the robots.


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#55 2017-03-19 22:25:20

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

^ yes, the Poster Boy of the Left and Saviour of the World harnesses the productive power of robots for profit.  lol


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#56 2017-03-21 07:41:55

gingham69
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

mmm....shiney! wrote:

@gingham, going to add anything to this debate?

Ahhhh so sweet of you to think of me! smile
Thanks for the offer but I'd just get the same robotic answers lol
Funny though you remind me of an old joke..
Why was the robot angry??  Because someone kept pushing his buttons cool

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#57 2017-03-21 18:57:20

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

gingham69 wrote:
mmm....shiney! wrote:

@gingham, going to add anything to this debate?

Ahhhh so sweet of you to think of me! smile
Thanks for the offer but I'd just get the same robotic answers lol
Funny though you remind me of an old joke..
Why was the robot angry??  Because someone kept pushing his buttons cool

Curious, you thanked a post of Big A.D.'s which arrived at an erroneous conclusion regarding the function of "profit". Don't you want to defend yourself and your obviously own erroneous belief?


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#58 2017-03-21 19:29:03

FullMetalFever
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

This discussion has been had many a time on this forum and it always seems to disintegrate into the same old arguments.

On one side you have your capitalists, libertarians, she'll be right mate, coz it always has been arguments. People will be re-trained, work other "jobs", do less hours, the supply and demand will make everything takes care of itself. We can explain all this way with basic economics, analysing past revolutions, and some quotes from "experts" on the subject ....

On the other, you have those thinking about the social implications of what a robotic (and more importantly AI) future means to the human race. Suggestions are thrown around about taxes, universal incomes, unemployment, poverty, etc, etc.

Without doubt, we are progressing full steam ahead into robotics. Anything to do with manual labour (particularly if it has a set process/procedure) will be replaced. It doesn't matter if its construction, food making/serving, transport, number crunching and even medical practice such as surgery. In this particular iteration, people WILL be replaced, they WILL need to re-skill/re-train, but there WILL still be other work that needs to be done and requires humans to do so. In this scenario, things will be much like previous technological advances/revolutions.

AI however, is another beast unto itself. When you have advanced AI combined with robotics (which itself will continue to evolve), you will surely arrive at a point in time when 99% of human production activity will become superfluous.

The robots/AI will survey the ground, organise the drilling, analyse the results, organise the mining, do the actual mining, take care of all the logistics. Materials will arrive at the factories where they will be completely received by the bots, processed, turned into widgets and placed for sale on the market (which has also been analysed) all by bots. Robots will break down, but with advanced robotics/AI, they will repair themselves (note this has traditionally been one of the re-skill areas - i.e. human servicing of the new tech). I challenge you to come up with occupations that will require humans (other than government and ownership of corporations that employ the bots) ...

At this point, the economists amongst us, will parrot out lines about labour becoming so cheap as a result of this, that it will once again be attractive for companies to hire humans. As Big A.D already pointed out, this is highly unlikely as there will still be multiple advantages of having bots over humans. They can work 24/7, don't complain, don't need sick/annual/whatever leave, no worries on OH&S, have a one time capital cost and will produce things exactly the same every time. Let's not mention that the robots will be building themselves (as well as the aforementioned extraction of materials, etc) and that should mean that robots are cheap to purchase.

Given this is a discussion forum, its my belief that the only thing up for discussion is the social impact and ways to deal with such. Shutting down such conversation with the capitalist view of she'll be right mate, it always has been and always will be, adds absolutely nothing to a forum that is already growing stale. Fact is, no-one knows/knew the future. Not Bastiat, Einstein, Nostradamus or even Billy Meier. Robotics/AI is likely to disrupt the human race more than any other previous advance and discussing the implications of such does not mean that someone is a chicken little who can only envisage dystopian futures.

Finally, for myself, I would like to think that I'll be able to seize the right opportunities to use robotics/AI to my advantage. I will look for any and all opportunities to create profits from such so that at some point in the future I can be on the beach sipping margaritas ....... but doing so of my own making and not hoping that government wealth redistribution will enable us all to do so.

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#59 2017-03-21 20:15:14

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

-1

Your use of use the terms "capitalist" and "economist" to imply that neither of these schools of thought have any concern for social matters is erroneous. Capitalism is the best method for enhancing society's outcomes and economics is the foundation of all human interaction. Both have community at the core.

it is not possible to escape from economics

Gustavo R. Velasco

The best way to ensure a prosperous future is to encourage capitalism and look to economics to guide our behaviours, this mean lowering any barriers to the free-market and encouraging entrepreneurs to find profitable solutions to whatever dilemma we may face. Chicken Littles are not helpful.


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#60 2017-03-21 20:20:05

Big A.D.
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

mmm....shiney! wrote:
Big A.D. wrote:

but you have no clue about what will happen when we start throwing robots and artificial intelligences into the mix?

Neither do you. Nor does anyone else.

So now is not the time to erect artificial barriers to productivity improvements.

Before things get f***ed up is the ideal time to develop procedures and protocols to guide future actions so that they occur in the way you want them to.


I am the Leafy Sea Dragon.

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#61 2017-03-21 20:28:48

Big A.D.
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

mmm....shiney! wrote:

Your use of use the terms "capitalist" and "economist" to imply that neither of these schools of thought have any concern for social matters is erroneous. Capitalism is the best method for enhancing society's outcomes and economics is the foundation of all human interaction. Both have community at the core.

We are specifically talking about increasing the level of interaction with machines at the expense of interaction with other humans.

For the concept of community to remain important, we can't just continue to assume that it is fundamental to everything we do while at the same time as completely changing the way we do everything.


I am the Leafy Sea Dragon.

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#62 2017-03-21 20:33:25

Silverthorn
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Registered: 2010-04-29
Posts: 2,584
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

FullMetalFever wrote:

This discussion has been had many a time on this forum and it always seems to disintegrate into the same old arguments.

On one side you have your capitalists, libertarians, she'll be right mate, coz it always has been arguments. People will be re-trained, work other "jobs", do less hours, the supply and demand will make everything takes care of itself. We can explain all this way with basic economics, analysing past revolutions, and some quotes from "experts" on the subject ....

On the other, you have those thinking about the social implications of what a robotic (and more importantly AI) future means to the human race. Suggestions are thrown around about taxes, universal incomes, unemployment, poverty, etc, etc.

Without doubt, we are progressing full steam ahead into robotics. Anything to do with manual labour (particularly if it has a set process/procedure) will be replaced. It doesn't matter if its construction, food making/serving, transport, number crunching and even medical practice such as surgery. In this particular iteration, people WILL be replaced, they WILL need to re-skill/re-train, but there WILL still be other work that needs to be done and requires humans to do so. In this scenario, things will be much like previous technological advances/revolutions.

AI however, is another beast unto itself. When you have advanced AI combined with robotics (which itself will continue to evolve), you will surely arrive at a point in time when 99% of human production activity will become superfluous.

The robots/AI will survey the ground, organise the drilling, analyse the results, organise the mining, do the actual mining, take care of all the logistics. Materials will arrive at the factories where they will be completely received by the bots, processed, turned into widgets and placed for sale on the market (which has also been analysed) all by bots. Robots will break down, but with advanced robotics/AI, they will repair themselves (note this has traditionally been one of the re-skill areas - i.e. human servicing of the new tech). I challenge you to come up with occupations that will require humans (other than government and ownership of corporations that employ the bots) ...

At this point, the economists amongst us, will parrot out lines about labour becoming so cheap as a result of this, that it will once again be attractive for companies to hire humans. As Big A.D already pointed out, this is highly unlikely as there will still be multiple advantages of having bots over humans. They can work 24/7, don't complain, don't need sick/annual/whatever leave, no worries on OH&S, have a one time capital cost and will produce things exactly the same every time. Let's not mention that the robots will be building themselves (as well as the aforementioned extraction of materials, etc) and that should mean that robots are cheap to purchase.

Given this is a discussion forum, its my belief that the only thing up for discussion is the social impact and ways to deal with such. Shutting down such conversation with the capitalist view of she'll be right mate, it always has been and always will be, adds absolutely nothing to a forum that is already growing stale. Fact is, no-one knows/knew the future. Not Bastiat, Einstein, Nostradamus or even Billy Meier. Robotics/AI is likely to disrupt the human race more than any other previous advance and discussing the implications of such does not mean that someone is a chicken little who can only envisage dystopian futures.

Finally, for myself, I would like to think that I'll be able to seize the right opportunities to use robotics/AI to my advantage. I will look for any and all opportunities to create profits from such so that at some point in the future I can be on the beach sipping margaritas ....... but doing so of my own making and not hoping that government wealth redistribution will enable us all to do so.

It's not just production. I read an article a short while back that was talking about using AI for replacing lawyers. A lot more than manual labor will be replaced by AI.

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#63 2017-03-21 21:16:21

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

Big A.D. wrote:

We are specifically talking about increasing the level of interaction with machines at the expense of interaction with other humans.

No we're not. We're talking about increasing the use of robotics in order to increase the economic outcomes for human beings. You're just assuming that increasing automation will come at the expense of human interaction and community.

Big A.D. wrote:

For the concept of community to remain important, we can't just continue to assume that it is fundamental to everything we do while at the same time as completely changing the way we do everything.

That sounds remarkably like an assumption. Increasing the level of automation in production is not completely changing the way we do everything. Humans have increasingly relied upon technology since the dawn of millenia.


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#64 2017-03-21 21:27:24

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

Big A.D. wrote:
mmm....shiney! wrote:
Big A.D. wrote:

but you have no clue about what will happen when we start throwing robots and artificial intelligences into the mix?

Neither do you. Nor does anyone else.

So now is not the time to erect artificial barriers to productivity improvements.

Before things get f***ed up is the ideal time to develop procedures and protocols to guide future actions so that they occur in the way you want them to.

And again, I point out that we don't know what the future holds, no one does, so who is in the best position now to make up a set of rules and protocols to guide current action with an eye to any potential future? God? Hanson? Trump?

There's a reason Musk and Hawking won Luddite awards for 2016 - because they were running around saying the very same thing as you.


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#65 2017-03-21 21:40:40

FullMetalFever
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From: Melbourne
Registered: 2012-08-06
Posts: 337
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

Silverthorn wrote:

It's not just production. I read an article a short while back that was talking about using AI for replacing lawyers. A lot more than manual labor will be replaced by AI.

Agreed. By production I meant any type of labour, not just manual.

Robotics will be the replacement for much of the manual labour. AI will be the replacement for much of the "thinking" labour. Put them both together and the future for humans becomes quite cloudy.

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#66 2017-03-21 22:03:24

FullMetalFever
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From: Melbourne
Registered: 2012-08-06
Posts: 337
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

mmm....shiney! wrote:

-1

Your use of use the terms "capitalist" and "economist" to imply that neither of these schools of thought have any concern for social matters is erroneous. Capitalism is the best method for enhancing society's outcomes and economics is the foundation of all human interaction. Both have community at the core.

it is not possible to escape from economics

Gustavo R. Velasco

The best way to ensure a prosperous future is to encourage capitalism and look to economics to guide our behaviours, this mean lowering any barriers to the free-market and encouraging entrepreneurs to find profitable solutions to whatever dilemma we may face. Chicken Littles are not helpful.

Again, you just espouse on the virtues of economics and capitalism without addressing any of the points that are actually worthy of discussion.

As I said above, there is little doubt that we are heading down that road. It will make business sense for robotics and AI to replace human workers and hence it will happen. We all get and have read many times your POV on this.

What I think everyone else is more interested in discussing (and that you continuously shirk) are the side issues of this discussion, such as:

- What jobs will humans be doing? Will there be enough of them?
- What does the social structure look like and how do we prevent a slip into a dystopian world?
- What will the world look and behave like?
- Is it really possible that robots take care of all production and we just enjoy the fruits of their labour? Want to talk economics - what are the economics of this? How do you practically do that? (without taxes, as we know you are vehemently opposed to taxes)
- At what point does the AI get smart enough that it decides humans are just a drain on "them"?
- What happens when robots and AI are so humanoid (think Westworld) that even something like the world's oldest profession is replaced?

Tell us what your vision of the future is Shiney!!! We don't care that you think economics and capitalism will make everything AOK. It's all fine and dandy to argue from your theoretical standpoint but you aren't even capable of telling us what you think it will look like and how it will play out amongst the human race.

(note - we are not asking you to be a prophet or a seer, just providing your vision based on your beliefs while addressing some of the topics above)

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#67 2017-03-21 22:04:22

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

This looks like an interesting site, it's the home of The Future of Life organisation. A think tank interested in ensuring technological advancements don't harm humanity.

https://futureoflife.org/

By the way, they may be smart and have a far superior grip on science and technology than most ordinary people, but that doesn't mean their opinions are infallible. Take this story for example: https://futureoflife.org/2017/03/16/sha … principle/


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#68 2017-03-21 22:11:09

bordsilver
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Posts: 9,610
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

FullMetalFever wrote:
Silverthorn wrote:

It's not just production. I read an article a short while back that was talking about using AI for replacing lawyers. A lot more than manual labor will be replaced by AI.

Agreed. By production I meant any type of labour, not just manual.

Robotics will be the replacement for much of the manual labour. AI will be the replacement for much of the "thinking" labour. Put them both together and the future for humans becomes quite cloudy.

As I posted, separating the discussion into non-AI and AI is useful.

The benefit of non-AI robotics is a no-brainer.

The benefit of true-AI crosses into the area of philosophy as you are talking about how different intelligent species can peacefully co-exist both practically and legally particularly in the presence of replication. Until it happens, however, there is only speculation. Read sci-fi books to find the thousands of possible beneficial, benign and non-beneficial ways that such things could play out.

Currently my bet is that if peaceful coexistence turns out to be hard with certain true-AI beings they'll quickly be put to the sword by humans and the variants of true-AI that can peacefully coexist for mutual benefit will simply get integrated into our culture and life will move on.

Last edited by bordsilver (2017-03-21 22:11:21)


The only good tax is a repealed tax.

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#69 2017-03-21 22:14:43

bordsilver
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

FullMetalFever wrote:

What I think everyone else is more interested in discussing (and that you continuously shirk) are the side issues of this discussion, such as:

- What jobs will humans be doing? Will there be enough of them?
- What does the social structure look like and how do we prevent a slip into a dystopian world?
- What will the world look and behave like?
- Is it really possible that robots take care of all production and we just enjoy the fruits of their labour? Want to talk economics - what are the economics of this? How do you practically do that? (without taxes, as we know you are vehemently opposed to taxes)

This is simply answering the question I've (repeatedly) posted over the years: "What does the owner of the robot factory making 10,000 shoes a day do with the shoes?"

Say's Law.


The only good tax is a repealed tax.

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#70 2017-03-21 22:16:05

FullMetalFever
Member
From: Melbourne
Registered: 2012-08-06
Posts: 337
Trades :   16 

Re: Robot Tax - Now

mmm....shiney! wrote:

By the way, they may be smart and have a far superior grip on science and technology than most ordinary people, but that doesn't mean their opinions are infallible. Take this story for example: https://futureoflife.org/2017/03/16/sha … principle/

You do realise this also holds true for the viewpoints you put forward - both yours and those you choose to quote?

e.g.

mmm....shiney! wrote:

Not trying to be rude, but the rest of your post is just your dystopian imagination echoing again. The issues raised have been addressed. With one exception:

So because you have "addressed"* them, they are no longer up for discussion? Because your opinions in your address* are infallible?


* I use the term address very loosely as more often you tend to skirt rather than address.

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#71 2017-03-21 22:22:10

FullMetalFever
Member
From: Melbourne
Registered: 2012-08-06
Posts: 337
Trades :   16 

Re: Robot Tax - Now

bordsilver wrote:
FullMetalFever wrote:
Silverthorn wrote:

It's not just production. I read an article a short while back that was talking about using AI for replacing lawyers. A lot more than manual labor will be replaced by AI.

Agreed. By production I meant any type of labour, not just manual.

Robotics will be the replacement for much of the manual labour. AI will be the replacement for much of the "thinking" labour. Put them both together and the future for humans becomes quite cloudy.

As I posted, separating the discussion into non-AI and AI is useful.

The benefit of non-AI robotics is a no-brainer.

The benefit of true-AI crosses into the area of philosophy as you are talking about how different intelligent species can peacefully co-exist both practically and legally particularly in the presence of replication. Until it happens, however, there is only speculation. Read sci-fi books to find the thousands of possible beneficial, benign and non-beneficial ways that such things could play out.

Currently my bet is that if peaceful coexistence turns out to be hard with certain true-AI beings they'll quickly be put to the sword by humans and the variants of true-AI that can peacefully coexist for mutual benefit will simply get integrated into our culture and life will move on.

Speculation as you say ....... isn't that the reason people take part in discussion forums????

I agree that it would be useful to split the conversation into AI and non-AI.

I have doubts that we would be able to "put to the sword" any non-peaceful existing AI. They could quickly surpass us both mentally and physically.

bordsilver wrote:

This is simply answering the question I've (repeatedly) posted over the years: "What does the owner of the robot factory making 10,000 shoes a day do with the shoes?"
Say's Law.

You may think its simply answering that question, many others think it goes deeper and would like to have a discussion about it without being shut down.

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#72 2017-03-21 22:23:28

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

FullMetalFever wrote:
mmm....shiney! wrote:

-1

Your use of use the terms "capitalist" and "economist" to imply that neither of these schools of thought have any concern for social matters is erroneous. Capitalism is the best method for enhancing society's outcomes and economics is the foundation of all human interaction. Both have community at the core.

it is not possible to escape from economics

Gustavo R. Velasco

The best way to ensure a prosperous future is to encourage capitalism and look to economics to guide our behaviours, this mean lowering any barriers to the free-market and encouraging entrepreneurs to find profitable solutions to whatever dilemma we may face. Chicken Littles are not helpful.

Again, you just espouse on the virtues of economics and capitalism without addressing any of the points that are actually worthy of discussion.

Because you assume that "capitalists" and 'economists" are not concerned with social issues.



FullMetalFever wrote:

- What jobs will humans be doing? Will there be enough of them?

  Who knows?

FullMetalFever wrote:

- What does the social structure look like and how do we prevent a slip into a dystopian world?

Who knows? Let the free-market reign.

FullMetalFever wrote:

- What will the world look and behave like?

Who knows?
[

FullMetalFever wrote:

- Is it really possible that robots take care of all production and we just enjoy the fruits of their labour?

FullMetalFever wrote:

Want to talk economics - what are the economics of this?

We apply means in order to achieve ends.

FullMetalFever wrote:

How do you practically do that? (without taxes, as we know you are vehemently opposed to taxes)

The same way we currently do it best. By reducing artificial barriers to production, and rewarding those who produce with profit.

FullMetalFever wrote:

- At what point does the AI get smart enough that it decides humans are just a drain on "them"?

Who knows?

FullMetalFever wrote:

- What happens when robots and AI are so humanoid (think Westworld) that even something like the world's oldest profession is replaced?

Who knows?

Sorry FMF, I thought I made it clear earlier that I don't have the answers. But neither does anyone. That's why it's best to leave humanity's outcome in the hands of those in the best position to determine what is best for themselves - individual consumers and the producers who profit from meeting their needs.

FullMetalFever wrote:

Tell us what your vision of the future is Shiney!!! We don't care that you think economics and capitalism will make everything AOK. It's all fine and dandy to argue from your theoretical standpoint but you aren't even capable of telling us what you think it will look like and how it will play out amongst the human race.

I thought I've made this clear on countless occasions. I'm an optimist, humanity is on an evolutionary path, both our political systems and our economic systems are evolving. In order to be truly human we must uphold the life, liberty and property of the individual. More and more people are slowly dawning to this idea, therefore the future for humanity is for our political and economic systems to reflect that life, liberty and property are paramount. The best way to achieve this is by embracing a political system that presents no hurdles to the free market.

I have a theory - a justified position evidenced by human practice and achievement.

Theory without practice is empty and practice without theory is blind

Last edited by mmm....shiney! (2017-03-21 22:25:12)


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#73 2017-03-21 22:28:54

mmm....shiney!
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

FullMetalFever wrote:
mmm....shiney! wrote:

By the way, they may be smart and have a far superior grip on science and technology than most ordinary people, but that doesn't mean their opinions are infallible. Take this story for example: https://futureoflife.org/2017/03/16/sha … principle/

You do realise this also holds true for the viewpoints you put forward - both yours and those you choose to quote?

No it doesn't. Did you read the article I linked to? They begin with an erroneous assumption, that income inequality is an undesirable outcome of the greater use of technology. They clearly do not understand economics.


The woolgrower's target shall be the good thriving of his flock and its pastures, and so of himself and those whose livelihoods depend on his enterprise.
"The Woolgrower's Companion", 1906.

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#74 2017-03-21 22:36:51

bordsilver
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

FullMetalFever wrote:

Speculation as you say ....... isn't that the reason people take part in discussion forums????

Absolutely. It's also why there are thousands of sci-fi books creating stories around the idea.

I agree that it would be useful to split the conversation into AI and non-AI.

FullMetalFever wrote:

I have doubts that we would be able to "put to the sword" any non-peaceful existing AI. They could quickly surpass us both mentally and physically.

But not numerically (on the assumption that it will become relatively quickly apparent if peaceful, mutually beneficial co-existence is not possible). I guess that a key is the rate at which the true-AI beings can replicate, communicate and form organised resistance once any such genocide begins.

FullMetalFever wrote:
bordsilver wrote:

This is simply answering the question I've (repeatedly) posted over the years: "What does the owner of the robot factory making 10,000 shoes a day do with the shoes?"
Say's Law.

You may think its simply answering that question, many others think it goes deeper and would like to have a discussion about it without being shut down.

Think deeply o' grasshopper and you will realise that the question is actually very deep. It also explains many things hidden in the world around us. smile


The only good tax is a repealed tax.

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#75 2017-03-21 22:38:45

FullMetalFever
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Re: Robot Tax - Now

mmm....shiney! wrote:

Who knows?

Who knows?

Who knows?

......

......

mmm....shiney! wrote:

I thought I've made this clear on countless occasions. I'm an optimist, humanity is on an evolutionary path, both our political systems and our economic systems are evolving. In order to be truly human we must uphold the life, liberty and property of the individual. More and more people are slowly dawning to this idea, therefore the future for humanity is for our political and economic systems to reflect that life, liberty and property are paramount. The best way to achieve this is by embracing a political system that presents no hurdles to the free market.

So basically nothing to add to the discussion other than the view everyone already knows you hold ..... hmmm .... perhaps you can just add the above quote as your response to any thread where that is all you're going to contribute and leave it at that?

It's quite funny actually ..... @Skyrocket gets asked to keep all his Billy Meier stuff in one thread but you constantly pollute other threads with the same points over and over. Don't you have your own threads on this stuff already?

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